Common Sexually Transmitted Diseases that can be Detected Mainly by Secretions - Safe-sex Common Sexually Transmitted Diseases that can be Detected Mainly by Secretions - Safe-sex
מיקום המרפאה: רחוב לוינסקי 108, בתוך התחנה המרכזית החדשה, בקומה 5 (מעל קווי אגד 4,5).
בחרו עמוד

Chlamydia

One of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, mainly between the ages of 15-25, is caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis.

The presence of the bacteria in the genitalia causes urethritis in men and cervical infections in women. Most people who are infected, both men and women, do not develop any symptoms, are not aware of the fact that they are infected, and therefore do not seek medical diagnosis and treatment, and thus may develop complications. Chlamydia is responsible, among other things, for 66% of mechanical infertility and 33% of ectopic pregnancies.

Symptoms of Chlamydia

The symptoms appear within 1 – 5 weeks of being infected and include:

*bacet

* Stinging or burning when urinating (for men)

* Slight bleeding, not during the menstrual cycle, mostly after having sex.

*Unusual vaginal discharge

*Abdominal pain when having sex (for women)

How is it detected? With a urine culture  that uses diagnostic amplification of DNA (PCR) to detect the bacteria.

Ways of becoming infected: Through unprotected vaginal and anal sex with a sick partner (oral transmittance is rare); from a sick mother to an infant during childbirth.

How is it treated? With antibiotic pills such as Doxylin or Azithromycin. The treatment is free of charge at the Levinsky Center.

Possible compilations for women if not treated: a pelvic infection that can lead to infertility, ectopic pregnancy; for men – orchitis, arthritis; for a newborn: an eye infection and lung infection. Prevention: proper and regular use of a condom is the best protection.

Window period for Chlamydia: a month and a half.

Gonorrhea

Similar to Chlamydia, Gonorrhea causes urethritis in men and cervical infections for women, however they are more "infected and inflamed" than with Chlamydia.

It is possible to have a rectal and anal infections when being rectally infected. The bacteria that causes the disease is called Neisseria gonorrhea and is carried by infected individuals in the genitalia and/or in the throat. Most men (95%) have symptoms and most women (80%) are asymptomatic. If the bacteria is in the throat it is rare to have any symptoms. It is possible to treat the disease in the beginning stages, however, as with any treatment, there may be complications.

Symptoms for Gonorrhea

Symptoms appear within one to seven days from having sex.

The following symptoms may appear:

For men – pustular discharge from the penis and intense burning when urinating. At times it is accompanied by enlargement and sensitivity in  the lymph nodes in the groin.

For women – pustular discharge from the uterus, vaginal bleeding, lower abdominal pain and pain when having sex (only 1/5 of women). If it was transmitted anally, then there are rectal secretions and localized pain.

Gonorrhea in the throat – throat pain (rare)

How is it detected?   A smear of the secretion and identification of the bacteria by looking at it directly under a microscope; a culture of the secretion and the throat to identify the bacteria and to check its sensitivity to antibiotics; detection of the bacteria in a urine culture using diagnostic amplifiation of DNA (PCR).

Ways to become infected: Through unprotected vaginal, oral and anal sex with an infected partner; from a sick mother to her infant during childbirth. It is important to remember it is possible to become infected from a partner who has no symptoms of the disease.

How is it treated? With antibiotics such as Ceftriaxone (rocephin) through an intramuscular injection. The treatment is given free of charge at the Levinsky Center.

Possible compilations for women if not treated: a pelvic infection which can lead to infertility, ectopic pregnancy; for men – rare; for a newborn: severe conjunctivitis (mucous membranes of the eyes).

Prevention:  proper and regular use of a condom is the best protection.

Window period for Gonorrhea: two weeks

Trichomonas

Is caused by a foreign cellular parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. The parasite has a common form. The natural repository of the parasite is a woman's vagina and it is transmitted through sex.  The man acts as the transmitter of the parasite from woman to woman and it is not rare for him to also suffer from certain symptoms (secretions from the penis). The morbidity rate, which is estimated in the world to be approximately 1 out of every 5 women and 1 out of every 10 men, is higher than what is reported in Israel. The parasite causes vaginal and cervical infections for women. Men, as indicated above, do not usually suffer from any symptoms. Nevertheless, if the parasite is discovered in the woman, both the man and woman need to be treated in order to prevent a repeat infection in the woman.

Symptoms of Trichomonas

For women it is very severe. The disease has a greenish-yellowish, creamy discharge and has a very foul odor. The odor tends to heighten after having sex. In addition, there may be a burning or stinging sensation in the opening of the vagina which is accompanied by significant redness and frequent urination. However, there are cases where the parasite is in the vagina and there are no symptoms at all.

Majority of men are asymptomatic. Very few suffer from secretions from the penis which are accompanied at times by stinging.

How is it detected? The laboratory diagnosis is based on detecting the parasite by directly looking at it under the microscope; a culture of the secretion; culture withthe PCR method.

Mainly expressed by ulcers (crater like lesions) on the genitalia.

Ways of getting infected: through unprotected vaginal and anal sex.

How is it treated?  Antibiotics such as Flagyl (metronidazole). Every partner who had sex with the infected woman should be simultaneously treated in order to prevent a repeat infection.

A possible complication if not treated, is premature childbirth when a pregnant woman has the disease.

Prevention: Proper and regular use of a condom is the best protection.

Ureaplasma urealyticum

This is bacteria that settles on male and female genitalia. Until recently, it was unknown whether the bacteria was part of the natural flora of sexual manners or whether it caused the disease. Recently, two sub-species were identified. One of them is related to urethritis, which is expressed by secretions from the male genitals and/or burning of the genitals. The bacteria is treated with antibiotics in the form of Doxylin.

Women are not treated because no connection between the presence of the bacteria and a cervical infection has been established. In addition, even when treated with Doxylin, it does not cause the disappearance of the infection.

Ureaplasma parvum is not a sexually transmitted disease. It is bacteria that is present in human genitals. The bacteria does not require antibiotic treatment because it is not an interfering bacteria.

 Mycoplasma Genitalium

This is bacteria that causes an infection that is expressed through secretions in the genitalia, similar to Chlamydia. The bacteria is discovered through a urine PCR test for generators of sexually transmitted diseases. The treatment is a 5 day azenil regimen. Alternatively, in cases in which the treatment has not been successful, it is recommended to treat with Megaxin.

Mycoplasma hominis is not a sexually transmitted disease.

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